Wednesday, March 13, 2013

A Tribute to William Burnes on March 13th

My big bro has been cancer-free in heaven for 7 years now, and Grandpa hasn't had to deal with his bad heart for 57 years. I am remembering these great men today and how ironic that they both died on March 13th, exactly 50 years apart. I am so grateful that I will see them again someday. This is where my family history journey began. There were too many coincidences that left me wondering, and wanting to learn more. Now I know the truth and continue to learn about my family history; I love "connecting the dots". Let's take a moment to remember those who have gone before us, and are now free from their pains and sufferings.

William Aaron Burnes Bio >> http://www.myburnesclan.com/2012/01/william-aaron-burnes-bio.html
William Emry Burnes >> http://www.myburnesclan.com/2010/03/my-grandparents-william-ruth-burnes.html

Monday, March 4, 2013

Robert Burns Biography "Scotland's Greatest Poet" 1759-1796


Robert Burns was born in Alloway, Scotland, on January 25, 1759, he was the first of William and Agnes Burnes' seven children. His father, a tenant farmer, educated his children at home. Burns also attended one year of mathematics schooling and, between 1765 and 1768, he attended an "adventure" school established by his father and John Murdock. His father died in bankruptcy in 1784, and Burns and his brother Gilbert took over farm. This hard labor later contributed to the heart trouble that Burns' suffered as an adult.

At the age of fifteen, he fell in love and shortly thereafter he wrote his first poem. As a young man, Burns pursued both love and poetry with uncommon zeal. In 1785, he fathered the first of his fourteen children. His biographer, DeLancey Ferguson, had said, "it was not so much that he was conspicuously sinful as that he sinned conspicuously." Between 1784 and 1785, Burns also wrote many of the poems collected in his first book, Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect, which was printed in 1786 and paid for by subscriptions. This collection was an immediate success and Burns was celebrated throughout England and Scotland as a great "peasant-poet."

In 1788, he and his wife, Jean Armour, settled in Ellisland, where Burns was given a commission as an excise officer. He also began to assist James Johnson in collecting folk songs for an anthology entitled The Scots Musical Museum. Burns' spent the final twelve years of his life editing and imitating traditional folk songs for this volume and for Select Collection of Original Scottish Airs. These volumes were essential in preserving parts of Scotland's cultural heritage and include such well-known songs as "My Luve is Like a Red Red Rose" and "Auld Land Syne." Robert Burns died from heart disease at the age of thirty-seven. On the day of his death, Jean Armour gave birth to his last son, Maxwell.

Most of Burns' poems were written in Scots. They document and celebrate traditional Scottish culture, expressions of farm life, and class and religious distinctions. Burns wrote in a variety of forms: epistles to friends, ballads, and songs. His best-known poem is the mock-heroic Tam o' Shanter. He is also well known for the over three hundred songs he wrote which celebrate love, friendship, work, and drink with often hilarious and tender sympathy. Even today, he is often referred to as the National Bard of Scotland.

Poems by Robert Burns, Click here >>

Poems By Robert Burns

A Man's A Man For A' That
by Robert Burns

Is there for honest Poverty 
   That hings his head, an' a' that; 
The coward slave—we pass him by, 
   We dare be poor for a' that! 
For a' that, an' a' that. 
   Our toils obscure an' a' that, 
The rank is but the guinea's stamp, 
   The Man's the gowd for a' that. 

What though on hamely fare we dine, 
   Wear hoddin grey, an' a that; 
Gie fools their silks, and knaves their wine; 
   A Man's a Man for a' that: 
For a' that, and a' that, 
   Their tinsel show, an' a' that; 
The honest man, tho' e'er sae poor, 
   Is king o' men for a' that. 

Ye see yon birkie, ca'd a lord, 
   Wha struts, an' stares, an' a' that; 
Tho' hundreds worship at his word, 
   He's but a coof for a' that: 
For a' that, an' a' that, 
   His ribband, star, an' a' that; 
The man o' independent mind 
   He looks an' laughs at a' that. 

A prince can mak a belted knight, 
   A marquis, duke, an' a' that; 
But an honest man's abon his might, 
   Gude faith, he maunna fa' that! 
For a' that, an' a' that, 
   Their dignities an' a' that; 
The pith o' sense, an' pride o' worth, 
   Are higher rank than a' that. 

Then let us pray that come it may, 
   (As come it will for a' that,) 
That Sense and Worth, o'er a' the earth, 
   Shall bear the gree, an' a' that. 
For a' that, an' a' that, 
   It's coming yet for a' that, 
That Man to Man, the world o'er, 
   Shall brothers be for a' that.


A Red, Red Rose 
by Robert Burns

O my luve's like a red, red rose,
    That's newly sprung in June;
O my luve's like the melodie
    That's sweetly played in tune.

As fair art thou, my bonnie lass,
    So deep in luve am I;
And I will luve thee still, my dear,
Till a' the seas gang dry.

Till a' the seas gang dry, my dear,
    And the rocks melt wi' the sun:
O I will love thee still, my dear,
    While the sands o' life shall run.

And fare thee weel, my only luve,
    And fare thee weel awhile!
And I will come again, my luve,
    Though it were ten thousand mile.

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